Legs

Biceps femorus, Semimembranosus, Semitendinosus


Workout Develpment & Muscle Combining Post Page

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Tibia, Fibula & Talus

 

Bones to remember:

    1. Tibia bone
    2. Tibial Platue
    3. Tibial Tuberosity
    4. Fibula
    5. Meniscus
    6. Talus

 

This is an illustration of the Tibia & Fibula connection to the Talus Bone forming the ankle joint

This is an illustration of the Tibia & Fibula connection to the Talus Bone forming the ankle joint.

{Tibia Fibula connection to the Talar Bone forming the ankle joint}
Tibia and Fibula bones with the interosseous membrane

Tibia and Fibula bones with the interosseous membrane

This shows the Tibia bone with the "Medial Malleolus" which is the hook shaped bone at the bottom of the Tibia Bone. It’s the bonny knot on the outside area (lateral) of the ankle joint.

This shows the Tibia bone with the “Medial Malleolus” which is the hook shaped bone at the bottom of the Tibia Bone. It’s the bonny knot on the outside area (lateral) of the ankle joint.

{Fibula}

{Fibula}


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Femur & Pelvic Bone Connection

 

Bones and area to remember:

  1. The thigh bone is called the “Femur”.

  2. The Femur has a Greater & Lessor Trochanter.

  3. Know the “Head” of the Femur and that it attaches to the hip joint called the “Acetabulum”.

  4. Lateral & Medial “Epicondyles”

Femur detailed with Head of the Femur, Greater & Lesser Trochanter, Medial & Lateral Epicondyles

Femur detailed with Head of the Femur, Greater & Lesser Trochanter, Medial & Lateral Epicondyles

Single view of the Femur Bone

Single view of the Femur Bone

Hip joint with Femur connection to hip joint

Hip joint with Femur connection to hip joint


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iliapsoas (ilio-so-as)-illiacus & Psoas Major together

Back Pain-John The Bodyman on Time Warner Cable.mp4

Attachment:The term iliopsoas (ilio-so-as) refers to the combination of the psoas (so-as)  major and the iliacus muscle at their lower (inferior) ends. Because of this connection they are given  the common name iliopsoas. These muscles are felt (palpated) by pressing threw the abdomen, and easy to feel when swollen.  The psoas minor does not contribute to the iliopsoas muscle.

{{iliopsoas muscle connection}

{iliopsoas muscle connection}

{Diagram of the pelvic girdle note the ilium pointing to the iliac fossa which houses the iliacus muscle}

{Diagram of the pelvic girdle note the ilium pointing to the iliac fossa which houses the iliacus muscle}

The psoas major originates along the outside (lateral) surfaces of the vertebral bodies of T12 ( 12th Thoracic vertebrae)   and L1-L5 (1st thru 5th lumbar vertebrae). The iliacus originates in the iliac fossa of the pelvis.

The psoas major unites with the iliacus at the level of the pelvic (iliac fossa) and crosses the hip joint to insert on the very tip (lesser trochanter) of the femur.

Action:The iliopsoas is involved in flexion, which is why it’s considered in the hip flexor group and lateral rotation (supination) of the thigh. If the limb is fixed they involve in flexion of the trunk.

Pain: the Iliopsoas is the main hidden reason for lower back.  Dr. Janet Travell, the mother of myofasical pain and trigger point medicine, named this muscle  as the “Hidden Prankster”!  Sports or prolonged siting are all contributors to this condition due to the repetitive hip flexion movements. Pain due to Iliopsoas inflammation is felt in the low back, hip particularly across the top of pelvic bone (Iliac Crest), groin, buttocks, lower area of the abdominals and higher area of the thigh.

{iliopsoas referred pain on the tip on the crest of the hip (illiac crest) and Sacrum2}

{iliopsoas referred pain on the tip on the crest of the hip (illiac crest) and Sacrum}

{iliopsoas refered pain in the low back and top thigh}

{iliopsoas referred pain in the low back and top thigh}

The only real effective way to stretch this muscle is the “Hurdler” stretch because of the pulling from the pelvic girdle and the crossing connection of the Rectus Femorus.

{Hurdler stretch for the iliopsoas}

{Hurdler stretch for the iliopsoas}

{Hurdler stretch for the iliopsoas single leg, less advanced}

{Hurdler stretch for the iliopsoas single leg, less advanced}

Watch this video link below on how to safely perform the “Hurdler” stretch. (Give it a few seconds to open)

Back Pain-John The Bodyman on Time Warner Cable.mp4

 

 

 


Piriformis Muscle and the Sciatic Nerve

(See Stretches)

(See Stretches)

{Piriformis p146}

{Piriformis p146}

{Piriformis p147}

{Piriformis p147}

 


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Soleus (Behind the Gastrocnemius)

{Soleus lies under the Gastrocnemius and attaches from top under the knee joint, unlike the gastrocnemius which attaches to the Epicondyles of the Femur crossing the knee joint)

{Soleus lies under the Gastrocnemius and attaches from top under the knee joint, unlike the gastrocnemius which attaches to the Epicondyles of the Femur crossing the knee joint)

Action: The soleus as a major contributor in ones walking motion (Normal Gate). One of the most frequently used muscles in the body, the soleus, originates just below the knee on the posterior surface of the tibia and the posterior fibula. The soleus muscle is responsible for plantar flexion and acts as an antagonist to the anterior tibialis by limiting the amount of dorsiflexion in the foot. When the soleus muscle is injured or stressed, the body mechanics can be extremely compromised.

Pain: Primary symptoms of Soleus pain are heel pain and restriction in ankle flection   Walking  uphill or up and down stairs can be very difficult due to pain and tenderness . Leaving the soleus muscle in a shortened position for a prolonged period of time, as when women wear high-heels. Anything that cuts off circulation a

Attachment: The Soleus attaches above from the upper portions of  the bones of the lower leg (the tibia and fibula), and  joins with the gastrocnemius to attach with the Achilles tendon at the heel bone (Calcaneus).

{Achilles’ tendon attachment to calcaneus. The Soleus is in red behind the Achilles’}

{Achilles’ tendon attachment to calcaneus. The Soleus is in red behind the Achilles’}


(The Calf) Gastrocnemius & Soleus

See Exercises

 

1) Gastrocnemius

{Gastrocnemius P154}

{Gastrocnemius P154}

{Gastrocnemius p155}

{Gastrocnemius p155}

Soleus

Soleus (Behind the Gastrocnemius)

Action: The soleus as a major contributor in ones walking motion (Normal Gate). One of the most frequently used muscles in the body, the soleus, originates just below the knee on the posterior surface of the tibia and the posterior fibula. The soleus muscle is responsible for plantar flexion and acts as an antagonist to the anterior tibialis by limiting the amount of dorsiflexion in the foot. When the soleus muscle is injured or stressed, the body mechanics can be extremely compromised.

Pain: Primary symptoms of Soleus pain are heel pain and restriction in ankle flection Walking uphill or up and down stairs can be very difficult due to pain and tenderness . Leaving the soleus muscle in a shortened position for a prolonged period of time, as when women wear high-heels. Anything that cuts off circulation a

Attachment: The Soleus attaches above from the upper portions of the bones of the lower leg (the tibia and fibula), and joins with the gastrocnemius to attach with the Achilles tendon at the heel bone (Calcaneus).

‘;


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Biceps Femoris, Semitendinosus and Semimembranosus

(See Exercises)

{Hamstrings Semitendinosus and semimembranosus Biceps Femoris}

{Hamstrings Semitendinosus and semimembranosus Biceps Femoris}

{Hamstring Injury on the Biceps Femorus)

{Hamstring Injury on the Biceps Femorus)

{Hamstrings p 142}

{Hamstrings p 142}

{Hamstrings p 143}

{Hamstrings p 143}

{Glutes--Hamstrings and Illiopsoas rear view(posterior) Notice how the Gluteus Maximus covers the connection of all the hamstrings to the Butt Bone (Ischial Tuberosity}

{Glutes–Hamstrings and illiopsoas rear view (posterior) Notice how the Gluteus Maximus covers the connection of all the hamstrings to the Butt Bone (Ischial Tuberosity}

 


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Ab-ductors –

See Exercises 

 Ab-duction refers to a motion in kinesiology that pulls a limb away from the midline of the body . For this section we will focus only on the Ab-ductors of the hip. To remember it, think of an “alien abduction.”

{Hip "Ab"-ductors Gluteus-Maximus-Medius and Minimus cut away}

{Hip “Ab”-ductors Gluteus-Maximus-Medius and Minimus also included is the Piriformis}

{Gluteus Maximus p144}

{Gluteus Maximus p144}

{Gluteus-Maximus}

{Gluteus-Maximus}

{Gluteus Maximus}

{Gluteus Maximus}

{Gluteus Medius p145}

{Gluteus Medius p145}

{Gluteus-Medius}

{Gluteus-Medius}

{Tensor Facia Lata aka IT Band (iliotibial Band)}

{Tensor Facia Lata aka IT Band (iliotibial Band)}

{Gluteus Minimus p146}

{Gluteus Minimus p146}

{Gluteus-Minimus}

{Gluteus-Minimus}

 

Ad-ductors

  •  Pectineus

  • Gracilis

  • Adductor Longus- Magnus and Brevis

{Ad-ductor-muscles Pectineus,Gracilis,Adductor Longus- Magnus and Brevis}

{Ad-ductor-muscles Pectineus,Gracilis,Adductor Longus- Magnus and Brevis}

{Adductors p148}

{Adductors p148}

{ Adductor Magnus}

{ Adductor Magnus}

{Adductor Brevis}

{Adductor Brevis}

{Adductor Longus}

{Adductor Longus}

{Adductors Con't p149}

{Adductors Con’t p149}

{Gracilis attaches to the ischial tuberosity and attaches below to medial condyle of the femur}

{Gracilis attaches to the ischial tuberosity and attaches below to medial condyle of the femur}

{Pectineus}

{Pectineus}


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Quadriceps (Front Thigh) Quad Mean 4

The quadriceps (Latin for “four-headed muscle of the femur”). Other  names gym enthusiasts use is  quadriceps, or quads.   They are responsible for extension of the knee and hip flexion. Below is a group drawing of these four muscles with a their connection from the pelvic, to the Femur (Thigh) and Tibia (shin) bone. View Exercises

{QuadricepsP 149}

{QuadricepsP 149}

{Quadriceps - Right Leg}

{Quadriceps – Right Leg}

{Quadriceps P150}

{Quadriceps P150}

{Rectus Femoris}

{Rectus Femoris}

 

{Quadriceps P151}

{Quadriceps P151}

{Vastus Intermedius}

{Vastus Intermedius}

{Vastus Lateralis}

{Vastus Lateralis}

{Quadriceps P152}

{Quadriceps P152}

{Vastus Medialis}

{Vastus Medialis}

{Quadriceps P153}

{Quadriceps P153}

{Knees Pain}

{Knees Pain}

{Group Single Quadriceps Group}

{Group Single Quadriceps Group}

 


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